Key demographic indicators

91.3 PER 1,000 LIVE BIRTHS

Under-five mortality rate

19,899,000

Population

Disparities by household wealth

Oral rehydration:
Children under five with receiving ORS (%)

Secondary education:
Net attendance ratio in secondary education (%)

Birth registration:
Children under age 5 whose births are registered (%)

Early Childhood

Attendance in early childhood education(%)
0
Support for learning (any household member) (%)
Support for learning (father) (%)
0
Learning materials at home – children's books (%)
0
Learning materials at home – playthings (%)
0
Children left in inadequate care (%)
0

 

 

A well developed and functioning civil registration system ensures the registration of all vital events including births, marriages and deaths and issues relevant certificates as proof of such registration. Civil registration promotes efficient government planning, effective use of resources and aid, and more accurate monitoring of progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

 

Legal framework for birth registration Law 2007-30 (3 December 2007) establishing the civil registry 

Decree No. 2008-189/PRN/MI/SP/D (17 June 2008) fixing the modalities of application of Law No. 2007-30

Official authorities in charge of registering births The mayors and their deputies are the civil status officers of the principal centres, and give authenticity to the acts of civil status. They are assisted by civil servants assigned or appointed for this purpose by decision of the mayor.

The registrars in the principal centres register the birth, marriage and death certificates, make transcripts and references to them, and deal with all administrative matters relating to civil status (Law 2007-30, article 38). Mayors may delegate all or part of their functions in matters of civil status to their deputies (Law 2007-30, article 39).

The officials of the secondary centres are civil registrars. They sign birth, marriage and death certificates (Law 2007-30, article 37).

The Ministry of the Interior, Public Security, Decentralization and Religious and Custom Affairs, Directorate General of Civil Status and Refugees (DGEC-R) oversees the process of civil registration.

Organizational structure Decentralized
Is there a legal obligation to register the birth of a child? Yes (Law 2007-30, article 31)
Is an official birth certificate issued as a result of birth registration? Yes, immediately
Legal informant to register a birth Father, Mother, One of the persons who attended the birth

(Law 2007-30, article 33)

Time allowed for registration 30 days; 10 days if birth occurred in a health facility

In the civil registration centres, and in the secondary centres of groups of villages or tribes, the declarations shall be made within 30 days (Law 2007-30, article 41). Births and deaths occurring in health facilities must be declared immediately, or within 10 days at the latest (Law 2007-30, article 42).

Fee for birth registration No
Can the fee be increased or waived? No
Fee for birth certificate No, extracts from civil status documents shall be issued free of charge. Copies of documents or extracts from civil status documents other than those requested by magistrates of the administrative or judicial order shall be stamped to the benefit of the communes
Penalty for late registration Yes

Fines are applied to the persons indicated in article 33 of Law No. 2007-30, (bearing the regime of the Civil State in Niger) if they fail to make a declaration or, unless there is a valid excuse, will not be present at the administrative census prescribed by the administrative, diplomatic or consular authority. This fine is levied for the benefit of the municipalities against delivery of a receipt extracted from a special-purpose register (Decree No. 2008-189, article 75).

Other official fees involved in the birth registration process No
Requirements or fees specific to children who are eligible for citizenship but were born outside the country No
Requirements or fees specific to children whose parents are foreign nationals No
Requirements for birth registration Identification of the child’s father, Identification of the child’s mother, Name of the child
Information collected Regarding the child: Name, Sex, Date and time of birth, Date of registration, Place of occurrence, Place of registration, Type of birth (single, multiple), Type of place of occurrence (hospital, home, etc.),

Regarding the mother of the child: Age, Place of birth, Marital status, Nationality, Educational attainment, Number of children born alive to the mother, Place of usual residence, Occupation

Regarding the father of the child: Age, Place of birth, Nationality, Educational attainment, Place of usual residence, Number of children born to the father, Occupation

Processing Manually (on paper)
Place of registration Main civil registration centres: Chief places of the commune, The Central Registry, Headquarters of diplomatic missions and consuls

Secondary centres are located in groups of districts, villages and tribes, or groups of villages and tribes according to their demographic weight.

A birth certificate is required for: Identification, Travel, Education, Voting
Process for establishing vital statistics on births Components of the registers of civil status documents intended for statistical purposes shall be sent every 3 months to the National Statistical Institute by the officers of the main centres through the departmental and regional directorates of civil status; these components are accompanied by the monthly summary alphabetical sheets (Decree No. 2008-189, article 37). However, no publication of vital statistics is released by the National Statistical Institute.

Download sample birth registration form

Data sources: Information on civil registration systems was compiled over a period from December 2016 to November 2017 using the existing relevant legal frameworks and in consultation with CRVS experts, officials within the relevant national institutions, and UNICEF country offices. All reasonable precautions have been taken by UNICEF to verify this country profile; updates will be made to reflect changes in policy and implementation and/or new information.

 

Legal framework for marriage registration Law 2007-30 (3 December 2007) establishing the civil registry 

Decree No. 2008-189/PRN/MI/SP/D (17 June 2008) fixing the modalities of application of the law No. 2007-30

Official authorities in charge of registering a marriage Mayors and their deputies

The mayors and their deputies are the civil status officers of the principal centres, and give authenticity to the acts of civil status. They are assisted by civil servants assigned or appointed for this purpose by decision of the mayor.

The registrars in the principal centres register the birth, marriage and death certificates, make transcripts and references to them, and deal with all administrative matters relating to civil status (Law 2007-30, article 38). Mayors may delegate all or part of their functions in matters of civil status to their deputies (article 39).

The officials of the secondary centres are civil registrars. They sign birth, marriage and death certificates (article 37).

The Ministry of the Interior, Public Security, Decentralization and Religious and Custom Affairs, Directorate General of Civil Status and Refugees (DGEC-R) oversees the process of civil registration.

Organizational structure Decentralized
Legal age for marriage 18 years for males, 15 years for females (Civil Code of the Niger, article 144)
Is there a legal obligation to register marriages? Yes
Is an official marriage certificate issued as a result of marriage registration?  Yes, immediately
Legal informant to register a marriage At least one of the persons concerned, At least one of the recognized witnesses, Religious leader having celebrated the marriage, Customary authority of the place of celebration if there is no official authority

(article 33)

Time allowed for registration 10 days; Marriages that are not celebrated before the registrar must be declared to the registrar within 10 days (article 43).
Fee for marriage registration No
Can the fee be increased or waived? No
Fee for marriage certificate No, extracts from civil status documents shall be issued free of charge. Copies of documents or extracts from civil status documents other than those requested by magistrates of the administrative or judicial order shall be stamped to the benefit of the communes (article 59).
Penalty for late registration Yes, fines are applied to the persons indicated in article 33 of Law No. 2007-30 (bearing the regime of the Civil State in Niger) if they fail to make a declaration or, unless there is a valid excuse, will not be present at the administrative census prescribed by the administrative, diplomatic or consular authority. This fine is levied for the benefit of the municipalities against delivery of a receipt extracted from a special-purpose register (Decree No. 2008-189, article 75).
Other official fees involved in the marriage registration process No
Additional registration requirements or fees if one spouse was born outside the country or has dual citizenship Yes; When one of the spouses is foreign and the other Nigerien, the marriage is registered or compulsorily celebrated in the Nigerien civil registration centres. In this case, the marriage certificate is sent to the ministry in charge of foreign affairs, which sends it to the embassy or consulate to which the foreign spouse belongs (article 77).
Requirements for marriage registration Presence of spouses at place of registration, Proof of spouses’ age, Names of the two parents of the married couple, Names of their witnesses, ID numbers of spouses and witnesses, Mention of the payment of the dowry, Choice of matrimonial regime
Information collected Regarding the spouses: Date of birth or age, Place of birth, Place of usual residence, Nationality, Occupation

Regarding the marriage: Date of occurrence, Date of registration, Place of occurrence, Place of registration

Processing Manually (on paper)
Place of registration Main civil registration centres: Chief places of the commune, The Central Registry, Headquarters of diplomatic missions and consuls;

Secondary centres are located in groups of districts, villages and tribes, or groups of villages and tribes according to their demographic weight.

A marriage certificate is required for: Inheritance, Birth registration of children
Process for establishing vital statistics on marriage Components of the registers of civil status documents intended for statistical purposes shall be sent every 3 months to the National Statistical Institute by the officers of the main centres through the departmental and regional directorates of civil status; these components are accompanied by the monthly summary alphabetical sheets (Decree No. 2008-189, article 37). However, no publication of vital statistics is released by the National Statistical Institute.

Download sample marriage registration form

Data sources: Information on civil registration systems was compiled over a period from December 2016 to November 2017 using the existing relevant legal frameworks and in consultation with CRVS experts, officials within the relevant national institutions, and UNICEF country offices. All reasonable precautions have been taken by UNICEF to verify this country profile; updates will be made to reflect changes in policy and implementation and/or new information.

 

Legal framework for death registration Law 2007-30 (3 December 2007) establishing the civil registry 

Decree No. 2008-189/PRN/MI/SP/D (17 June 2008) fixing the modalities of application of Law No. 2007-30

Official authorities in charge of registering a death The mayors and their deputies are the civil status officers of the principal centres, and give authenticity to the acts of civil status. They are assisted by civil servants assigned or appointed for this purpose by decision of the mayor.

The registrars in the principal centres register the birth, marriage and death certificates, make transcripts and references to them, and deal with all administrative matters relating to civil status (Law 2007-30, article 38). Mayors may delegate all or part of their functions in matters of civil status to their deputies (article 39).

The officials of the secondary centres are civil registrars. They sign birth, marriage and death certificates (article 37).

The Ministry of the Interior, Public Security, Decentralization and Religious and Custom Affairs, Directorate General of Civil Status and Refugees (DGEC-R) oversees the process of civil registration.

Organizational structure Decentralized
Is there a legal obligation to register deaths? Yes (article 31)
Is an official death certificate issued as a result of death registration?  Yes, immediately
Legal informant to register a death The surviving spouse, One of the parents, At least one of the closest neighbours (or the first informed, if not the customary authority of the place of death), Law enforcement officer, Member of the medical corps, Any other recognized witness (article 33)
Time allowed for registration 30 days or 10 days if death occurred in a health facility;

In the civil registration centres, and in the secondary centres of groups of villages or tribes, the declarations shall be made within 30 days (article 41). Births and deaths occurring in health facilities must be declared immediately, or within 10 days at the latest (article 42).

Fee for death registration No
Can the fee be increased or waived? No
Fee for death certificate No, extracts from civil status documents shall be issued free of charge. Copies of documents or extracts from civil status documents other than those requested by magistrates of the administrative or judicial order shall be stamped to the benefit of the communes (article 59).
Penalty for late registration Yes; Fines are applied to the persons indicated in article 33 of Law No. 2007-30 (bearing the regime of the Civil State in Niger) if they fail to make a declaration or, unless there is a valid excuse, will not be present at the administrative census prescribed by the administrative, diplomatic or consular authority. This fine is levied for the benefit of the municipalities against delivery of a receipt extracted from a special-purpose register (Decree No. 2008-189, article 75).
Other official fees involved in the death registration process No
Registration requirements or fees specific for the deaths of people who were residents in the country and also of foreign nationality No
Requirements for death registration Date of death, Age at death
Information collected Regarding the deceased: Name, Sex, Date of birth or age, Place of birth, Nationality, Marital status, Educational level, Place of usual residence, Occupation, Number of children

Regarding the death: Date of death, Date of registration, Place of occurrence, Place of registration, Cause of death, Type of place of occurrence (hospital, home, etc.)

Information collected in case of fetal death Fetal deaths are not registered.
Processing Manually (on paper)
Place of registration Main civil registration centres: Chief places of the commune, The Central Registry, Headquarters of diplomatic missions and consuls

Secondary centres are located in groups of districts, villages and tribes, or groups of villages and tribes according to their demographic weight.

A death certificate is required for: Inheritance, Obtaining social assistance.
Process for establishing vital statistics on deaths Components of the registers of civil status documents intended for statistical purposes shall be sent every 3 months to the National Statistical Institute by the officers of the main centres through the departmental and regional directorates of civil status; these components are accompanied by the monthly summary alphabetical sheets (Decree No. 2008-189, article 37).

However, no publication of vital statistics is released by the National Statistical Institute.

Data sources: Information on civil registration systems was compiled over a period from December 2016 to November 2017 using the existing relevant legal frameworks and in consultation with CRVS experts, officials within the relevant national institutions, and UNICEF country offices. All reasonable precautions have been taken by UNICEF to verify this country profile; updates will be made to reflect changes in policy and implementation and/or new information.

 

MICS

Since its inception in 1995, the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, known as MICS, has become the largest source of statistically sound and internationally comparable data on women and children worldwide. In countries as diverse as Costa Rica, Mali and Qatar, trained fieldwork teams conduct face-to-face interviews with household members on a variety of topics – focusing mainly on those issues that directly affect the lives of children and women.