Key demographic indicators

54.1 PER 1,000 LIVE BIRTHS

Under-five mortality rate

4,620,000

Population

Disparities by household wealth

Oral rehydration:
Children under five with receiving ORS (%)

Secondary education:
Net attendance ratio in secondary education (%)

Birth registration:
Children under age 5 whose births are registered (%)

HIV/AIDS

Percentage of pregnant women living with HIV receiving most effective ARVs for PMTCT (%)
16
Estimated number of new HIV infections among children 0-14 years
1,100
HIV positive children (aged 0-14) receiving antiretroviral therapy (%)
25
Estimated number of new HIV infections among adolescents aged 15-19
<1,000

CONGO

 

 

A well developed and functioning civil registration system ensures the registration of all vital events including births, marriages and deaths and issues relevant certificates as proof of such registration. Civil registration promotes efficient government planning, effective use of resources and aid, and more accurate monitoring of progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

 

Legal framework for birth registration Law No. 073/84  on the Code of the Congolese Family (17 October 1984)
Official authorities in charge of registering births Mayors of the communes, Sub-prefects, Administrators/mayors of arrondissements and urban communities
Organizational structure Decentralized
Is there a legal obligation to register the birth of a child? Yes (Code of the Congolese Family, article 24)
Is an official birth certificate issued as a result of birth registration? Yes
Legal informant to register a birth Father or mother, Ascendant or close relative, Doctor, midwife or matron, Witness or attendant to the birth (Code of the Congolese Family, article 45)
Time allowed for registration 1 month (Code of the Congolese Family, article 45)
Fee for birth registration No
Can the fee be increased or waived? No
Fee for birth certificate No
Penalty for late registration Yes
Other official fees involved in the birth registration process No
Requirements or fees specific to children who are eligible for citizenship but were born outside the country No
Requirements or fees specific to children whose parents are foreign nationals No
Requirements for birth registration The declarant must produce a certificate from a doctor or midwife in support of the declaration or have two witnesses attest the birth

(Code of the Congolese Family, article 45)

Information collected The birth certificate must state:

– Year, month, day, time, place of birth;

– Child’s sex, surname and given names;

– Ages, surnames, first names, profession and place of residence of the parents and, where appropriate, those of the declarant or the witnesses.

If the day of birth cannot be specified by the declarant or the witnesses, a date of birth is fixed ex officio by the Civil Registrar or by the President of the People’s Court in the village-centre or district.

(Code of the Congolese Family, article 46)

Processing Manually (on paper)
Place of registration Municipality, Sub-prefecture, Officer/Chief of the village
A birth certificate is required for: Identification, Education, Voting
Process for establishing vital statistics on births The Code of the Congolese Family, supplemented by General Instruction No. 0501/MISDRRP/DGAT/DINEC (23 December 1994), requires each civil registrar to send, after the establishment of a civil status document, a statistical component and a summary of recorded civil status records.

In practice, however, civil registration documents for statistical exploitation have rarely been received by the National Centre for Statistics and Economic Studies (CNSEE) during the past decade. The secondary registration centres are obliged to design forms for registration of vital events (live births, deaths, registered marriages) by sex, age and occupation, which are sent to the main centres for filling.

Download sample birth registration form 

Data sources: Information on civil registration systems was compiled over a period from December 2016 to November 2017 using the existing relevant legal frameworks and in consultation with CRVS experts, officials within the relevant national institutions, and UNICEF country offices. All reasonable precautions have been taken by UNICEF to verify this country profile; updates will be made to reflect changes in policy and implementation and/or new information.

 

Legal framework for marriage registration Law No. 073/84  on the Code of the Congolese Family (17 October 1984)
Official authorities in charge of registering a marriage Mayors of the communes, Sub-prefects, Administrators/mayors of arrondissements and urban communities
Organizational structure Decentralized
Legal age for marriage 21 years for males, 18 years for females;

Exemptions: Public Prosecutor of the People’s Court of the District or District may grant waivers of age for serious reasons (Code of the Congolese Family, article 128).

Is there a legal obligation to register marriages? Yes (Code of the Congolese Family, article 53)
Is an official marriage certificate issued as a result of marriage registration?  Yes, immediately
Legal informant to register a marriage Bride and groom
Time allowed for registration The Civil Status Officer shall celebrate the marriage in the manner prescribed by sections 150 and 155 and shall immediately draw up the marriage certificate (Code of the Congolese Family, article 58)
Fee for marriage registration Yes
Can the fee be increased or waived?
Fee for marriage certificate No
Penalty for late registration No
Other official fees involved in the marriage registration process No
Additional registration requirements or fees if one spouse was born outside the country or has dual citizenship No
Requirements for marriage registration Two months before the date fixed for the celebration of the marriage, the future spouses must deliver to the officer of the State or civil authorities of their domicile:

– An extract from their birth certificate or any act in lieu thereof, issued for less than six months;

– Copies of the acts granting the exemptions provided for by law;

– An act attesting to the payment of the dowry, issued by the persons mentioned in article 141 or a joint declaration of the same persons renouncing the dowry;

– A notary’s certificate in the case of a marriage contract;
– A prenuptial medical certificate.

(Code of the Congolese Family, article 139)

Information collected The marriage certificate must state:

– Name, surname, occupation, date and place of birth, residence of each spouse;

– In the case legal exemptions on age for one of the spouses, consent or authorization given in accordance with the provisions of article 130;

– Option of monogamy or polygamy eventually subscribed by the spouses;

– Payment or not of a dowry under conditions of marriage in accordance with article 141;

– Choice of the matrimonial regime adopted by the future spouses;

– Whether the spouse was ‘divorced’ in the case of a previous marriage, if it is a monogamous marriage;

– Declaration of the contractors to take themselves as spouses and to pronounce their union by the Civil Registrar, or the declaration of the contractors according to which the marriage was celebrated according to the custom, with confirmation of this union by the Civil Registration Officer;

– Name, surname, profession, domicile of the witnesses and, where applicable, the interpreter, and their status as adults.

(Code of the Congolese Family, article 59)

Processing Manually (on paper)
Place of registration Municipality, Sub-prefecture, Officer/Chief of the village
A marriage certificate is required for: Inheritance, Child registration
Process for establishing vital statistics on marriage The Code of the Congolese Family, supplemented by General Instruction No. 0501/MISDRRP/DGAT/DINEC (23 December 1994), requires each civil registrar to send, after the establishment of a civil status document, a statistical component and a summary of recorded civil status records.

In practice, however, civil registration documents for statistical exploitation have rarely been received by the National Centre for Statistics and Economic Studies (CNSEE) during the past decade. The secondary registration centres are obliged to design forms for registration of vital events (live births, deaths, registered marriages) by sex, age and occupation, which are sent to the main centres for filling.

Download sample marriage registration form

Data sources: Information on civil registration systems was compiled over a period from December 2016 to November 2017 using the existing relevant legal frameworks and in consultation with CRVS experts, officials within the relevant national institutions, and UNICEF country offices. All reasonable precautions have been taken by UNICEF to verify this country profile; updates will be made to reflect changes in policy and implementation and/or new information.

 

Legal framework for death registration Law No. 073/84  on the Code of the Congolese Family (17 October 1984)
Official authorities in charge of registering a death Mayors of the communes, Sub-prefects, Administrators/mayors of arrondissements and urban communities
Organizational structure Decentralized
Is there a legal obligation to register deaths? Yes (Code of the Congolese Family, article 24)
Is an official death certificate issued as a result of death registration?  Yes
Legal informant to register a death One of the parents of the deceased, Any other person possessing the necessary information (Code of the Congolese Family, article 60)
Time allowed for registration 48 hours (Code of the Congolese Family, article 60)
Fee for death registration No
Can the fee be increased or waived? No
Fee for death certificate No
Penalty for late registration Yes
Other official fees involved in the death registration process No
Registration requirements or fees specific for the deaths of people who were residents in the country and also of foreign nationality No
Requirements for death registration No
Information collected The death certificate must state:

– Year, month, day, time and place of death;

– Sex, surname and forename, date and place of birth, occupation and domicile of the deceased;

– Surname and forename of the spouse if the deceased was married, widowed or divorced;

– Surname, forename, age, occupation and domicile of the declarant and, if applicable, his or her degree of relationship with the deceased.

Information collected includes ‘as much as one can know’. However, no record of the circumstances of the death shall be given in the registers unless the identity of the corpse remains unknown. In the event of death in a penal or rehabilitation institution, only the place where the death occurred must be indicated.

(Code of the Congolese Family, article 61)

Information collected in case of fetal death When a stillborn child is declared, the declaration is entered on his or her date in the register of deaths and not that of births, and mentions only mentions that the stillborn has been declared a lifeless child (Code of the Congolese Family, article 48).
Processing Manually (on paper)
Place of registration Municipality, Sub-prefecture, Officer/Chief of the village
A death certificate is required for: Inheritance, Obtaining social assistance
Process for establishing vital statistics on deaths The Code of the Congolese Family, supplemented by General Instruction No. 0501/MISDRRP/DGAT/DINEC (23 December 1994), requires each civil registrar to send, after the establishment of a civil status document, a statistical component and a summary of recorded civil status records.

In practice, however, civil registration documents for statistical exploitation have rarely been received by the National Centre for Statistics and Economic Studies (CNSEE) during the past decade. The secondary registration centres are obliged to design forms for registration of vital events (live births, deaths, registered marriages) by sex, age and occupation, which are sent to the main centres for filling.

Download sample death registration form

Data sources: Information on civil registration systems was compiled over a period from December 2016 to November 2017 using the existing relevant legal frameworks and in consultation with CRVS experts, officials within the relevant national institutions, and UNICEF country offices. All reasonable precautions have been taken by UNICEF to verify this country profile; updates will be made to reflect changes in policy and implementation and/or new information.

 

MICS

Since its inception in 1995, the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, known as MICS, has become the largest source of statistically sound and internationally comparable data on women and children worldwide. In countries as diverse as Costa Rica, Mali and Qatar, trained fieldwork teams conduct face-to-face interviews with household members on a variety of topics – focusing mainly on those issues that directly affect the lives of children and women.